Like small children, puppies have short attention spans and get tired quickly. Keep your puppy training sessions short – 5 to 10 minutes is enough – but regular. Two or three short training sessions every day is ideal. And, remember, you can build in the ‘come’ command throughout the day; for example, when you want to feed your puppy or play with him.
When it comes to house training, you don’t have to be a scientist to work out what goes in must come out. If you feed your puppy a quality, balanced dog food and stick to regular meal times (3 times a day for young puppies, dropping down to twice a day for older dogs), then your puppy is more likely to have regular toileting habits – which means you’ll have more of an idea of what time to take him out. If, on the other hand, you offer your puppy constant treats and tidbits and feed him at different times of the day, you can expect your puppy to need to toilet at any time of day too.
First of all take a treat, hold it in your hand and wrap your fingers around it and no matter how much your dog tries to get at it, bite your hand or paw at your hand you mustn't let him have it. What you have to wait for is the minute that his nose comes away from your hand. That's what you're rewarding him for. He needs to know that he's never ever going to get a treat by biting your hand.
Carry a handful of treats (or one of these convenient treat pouches).  Walk around your yard, giving a treat to your dog while you’re walking every few steps. Give the treat down at your side, by your thigh. The idea is to convey ‘being right here next to mama when she’s walking means I get treats!’ Otherwise, completely ignore your dog. If he moves off and reaches the end of the leash, just stop walking until you get enough slack in the line to keep moving. How Long Does It Take To Train A Guard Dog ?
As part of your puppy’s training, then, you should do everything you can to ensure that your puppy can’t get into trouble in the first place. That way you can avoid giving your puppy lots of ‘negative’ attention which might inadvertently encourage his bad behaviour. For example, if you use a crate, or confine your puppy to one room of the house, he is far less likely to get into trouble chewing something he shouldn’t, or peeing somewhere he shouldn’t. 

Liz London is a certified dog trainer through the Certifying Council of Professional Dog Trainers (CPDT-KA) & the Karen Pryor Academy (Dog Trainer Foundations Certification) with regular continuing education courses from the top animal trainers from all over the world, including Michele Pouliot, director of training for the Guide Dogs for the Blind. She has trained zoo animals, search & rescue canines, gundogs, and helped people raise happy, healthy, and well-behaved canine companions for over ten years.
I don't teach or recommend so-called "purely positive" methods that allow misbehaving pups to continue misbehaving, instead of teaching them which behaviors are and are not allowed. "Purely positive" is fine for teaching tricks and high-level competition exercises, but NOT for teaching the solid good behaviors that all family dogs need to know, and NOT for stopping behavior problems such as barking, jumping, chewing, nipping, chasing, etc.
Clicker training, a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It's fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog dog training classes
Carry a handful of treats (or one of these convenient treat pouches).  Walk around your yard, giving a treat to your dog while you’re walking every few steps. Give the treat down at your side, by your thigh. The idea is to convey ‘being right here next to mama when she’s walking means I get treats!’ Otherwise, completely ignore your dog. If he moves off and reaches the end of the leash, just stop walking until you get enough slack in the line to keep moving. How Does Cesar Millan Train A Dog With A Leash ?
×